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Can towns ban a disabled soldier's pit bull?
     (LAFAYETTE, Ind., March 03, 2015) -- Although Wayne Tibbett still has the utmost respect for the U.S. military, his nine-month deployment in 2009 to Afghanistan left indelible marks.
     He remembers evacuating the bodies of wounded and dead compatriots.
     "One of (the medical evacuations) contained three of my (battle) buddies who were wounded and the other one contained my company commander who was actually killed," said the 27-year old who currently lives off-post in Felts Mills, New York, and is stationed at Fort Drum military base.
     About a year later, an Army doctor diagnosed Tibbett with post-traumatic stress disorder. To this day, he still experiences fear and anxiety, especially in crowded places. FULL STORY at indystar.com

Bank of America pays $155,000 in settlement of MN discrimination claim
     (MINNESOTA, March 02, 2015) -- Bank of America has settled a loan discrimination case with a hearing-impaired Minnesota woman for $155,000.
     Kathryn Letourneau of North Branch filed a complaint in 2012 with the Human Rights Department claiming that, due to her disability (a hearing impairment), she'd asked Bank of America to communicate with her solely through email on a $140,000 loan modification. At first, the bank complied with the request, but eventually stopped and then denied the loan modification.
     The Minnesota Department of Human Rights had determined probable cause in the case, finding that "Bank of America’s denial of the loan modification was attributable to Bank of America’s refusal to reasonably accommodate the deaf customer’s request to communicate by email," the department said.
     While denying that it discriminated against Letourneau, Bank of America agreed to pay $145,000; two-thirds to Letourneau and one-third to her attorney, Gilbert Law. Another $10,000 goes to the state's Dispute Resolution fund. FULL STORY at minnpost.com

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